Archive for February, 2011

There seems no end to the unrest and riots in different Northern African countries and some other Arab ones. We hear that in Lybia over 600 people were killed and thousands wounded by government forces, who were shooting on the orders of Kadaffi who does not want to give up his rule, unlike what happened in Egypt. I wonder what the world would say if something similar were to happen in Israel. When civilians are killed here by accident, or because they were used as human shields, the countries of the world are all up in arms against us, but when it happens and hundreds, or maybe thousands lose their lives in Muslim countries, they stand still. The strange thing is that Muslims of different sects (Shi’ites and Sunis) fight each other, even though they belong to the same religion.
 
Two Iranian battle ships are sailing to the Mediteranean Sea, on their way to a port in Syria. They say it is only for exercises!! But who knows the real reason? They will  pass through the Suez Canal on their way and Egypt allows this. Prime Minister Netanyahu said on Sunday that Israel views with utmost gravity the intent of Iran to send warships to the Mediteranean. He termed this as an “Iranian attempt to expand their influence in this region”.
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Well, after all those riots in Egypt, Mubarak was forced to resign in the end, but the future of what or who will become Egypt’s ruler is still unknown. If it is the Muslim Brotherhood, it will be a direct threat on Israel and possibly the United States. In 1979 in Iran the radical clerics promised a peaceful future, but instead they became a revolutionary dictatorship, with no rights for the common people.  Will this happen again in Egypt?
 
But now, after successful riots in Tunisia and Egypt, the Iranian people are also trying again to take down their corrupt leadership (dictatorship), especially taking into account  Ahmadinijad’s words alluding to what was happening in Egypt,” The people there have a right to protest.”  He must have regretted these words later as the Iranians evidently took his words seriously, and started demonstrating too, but the Iranian forces have orders to put this down and are using clubs, tear gas and other means against them, hundreds have been arrested and there have already been some fatalities. Telephone lines have been cut down and homes of opposition leaders have been blockaded in some places. People only talk anonymously for fear of reprisals from the authorities.  The first demonstrations were initiated “to show solidarity with the popular protests in Egypt” but have now turned into a local protest – maybe to revive the months of relative quiet after what were surely forged election results. Then there had also been protests, quickly put down by the government. But how can Ahmadinejad say “Yes to the rights o the Arab peoples, but deny those same rights to his own?”.
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I presume that most of my readers have heard or read about the riots going on in Egypt for almost a week. Cairo, Egypt’s capital, a city of about 18 million people, was the scene of violent chaos as tens of thousands of anti-government protesters stoned and confronted police, who fired back with rubber bullets and tear gas — a major escalation in the biggest challenge to Egyptian President Mubarak’s  30-year rule. The rioters claim it is the bad economic situation which is forcing them to demand Mubarak’s resignation and that no political faction is behind them. But that doesn’t explain the much looting going on, the destroying of property, even breaking into the Egyptiam national museum and breaking up ancient exhibits.

 We in Israel believe that if the regime falls, the successor regime will not be a liberal democracy and mostly fear that the fanatic “Muslim Brotherhood” will come into power. Mubarak has kept peaceful relations with Israel all these years, and if the Muslim brotherhood which is supported by Iran, takes over, we are afraid it will be the end of this peace. Mubarak’s military authoritarianism will be replaced by Islamic totalitarianism.

President Shimon Peres met with German Chancellor Angela Merkel a few days ago, and they discussed Egypt, peace talks and the Iranian nuclear program. Concerning Egypt he said “Democracy can not start and end in elections only. True democracy begins on the day after the elections, in granting human rights and concern for citizens’ welfare. And if a religious extremist dictatorship rises the day after democratic elections, (like the Hamas in Gaza) what are democratic elections worth.”  He added,” Iran is working to bring a religious hegemony to the Middle East. The Iranian problem is not an Israeli monopoly, but an international problem.

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